How to Make Your Own Macrame Fruit Basket

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Macrame has taken the craft world by storm this year – not only is it an easy craft to pick up, and a relaxing pastime to while away an afternoon with – but it’s a great way to quickly whip up a few useful home accessories too! We love this macrame fruit basket created by Mandy Cameron, because not only does it provide an optimal way to keep your fruit stored safely (plenty of air can circulate!) but the hanging design means it saves you tabletop space, too! Check out her tutorial below and learn exactly how to create your own.

You Will Need:

  • 3mm cotton cord cut into 24 x 2m lengths
  • Wooden rings / embroidery hoops:
    • 7” (18cm) wooden hoop (inside of embroidery ring)
    • 6” (15cm) wooden hoop (inside of embroidery ring)
    • 2” (5cm) wooden hoop (inside of embroidery ring)
  • Portable clothes rail to work from
    (or anywhere you can comfortably hang strands and loops to work, ie. curtain pole, shower rail, etc)

How to Make a Macrame Fruit Basket:

Step 1:

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Begin by attaching the small hanging ring to your working pole with an S hook, or tie it in place with spare string.

Take 1 length of cord, and fold into thirds so you can make one part twice as long as the other. Place fold through hanging loop and create Lark’s Head Knot making sure the shorter strand is on the right-hand side. Repeat again but with the shorter strand on the left side.

Repeat this process 3 more times. Split them into 4 sections, each containing 4 strands with 2 long outer strands and 2 shorter inner strands.

Step 2:

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Using the first 4 strands, smooth out the middle 2 shorter lengths and, with the longer lengths, work 10 Half Knot Spirals.

Leave a gap of 2.5” (6cm) and work a further 10 Half Knot Spirals. Repeat this twice more (4 spirals, 3 gaps, as shown).

Complete the same process on the other 3 sections of 4 strands.

Step 3:

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Take the larger ring and split one of the 4 sections into 2 x 2 strands. Place a pair on either side of the ring and bring back together underneath and make an Overhand Knot. Trim ends down to ¾” (2cm) and undo twists to create a frayed tassel.

Repeat with the remaining 3 sections keeping wooden ring level (creating 4 arms, as shown).

Step 4:

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With 2 x 2m lengths, fold in half and make Lark’s Head knot on the wooden ring in between 2 of the arms. Work 2 Square Knots. With another 2 x 2m lengths, repeat this process keeping in between the same 2 arms.

Repeat 3 times more, working in between the remaining arms.

Step 5:

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Take 2 outer strands from neighbouring knots and make 1 Square Knot about 1” (2.5cm) below a frayed tassel.

Repeat this process 3 more times with the remaining sections.

Step 6:

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Repeat complete process above (step 5) once more.

Step 7:

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With smaller ring, make Double Half Hitch Knots with every strand at the base of all Square Knots around the small hoop, spacing evenly.

Step 8:

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Gather all the strands together at the base and tie an Overhand Knot, keeping all strands as even as possible.

I left the extra large tassel at the bottom as it was and didn’t trim it or fray it, as I liked its random appearance! If you prefer, you can cut it to any length you choose and then… to fray or not to fray!

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If you enjoyed this project and would like more macrame inspiration, how about these gorgeous boho coasters?

As our content marketing executive in charge of the Create and Craft blog, Lisa loves nothing more than writing about all things craft. ‘When I’m not at work, you’ll find me attempting a wonky crochet project, playing with watercolours or trying my hand at the latest awesome craft tutorial to cross my desk!’

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